A work in progress 4: A work complete

Grouted and polished, the table is finally complete and is now a working piece of furniture and I must admit, that I am pretty pleased with the final outcome. As I have found many times before the grouting has made … Continue reading

A work in progress 3: Nearly there!

After some more hard work the mosaic is more or less complete now, the last tesserae have been laid, and now it only needs grouting to consolidate it and finish it proper. As the opposite half exhibited a personification of … Continue reading

Another Month, Another Mosaic

Another month has gone by and so I have another mosaic,  but not for me this time but a gift for someone else.  A couple of months ago it was suggested to me that I should make a mosaic tray … Continue reading

A Classical Mosaic Tray

Recently I’ve relocated for a new exciting job and in the process have had to leave the mosaics behind for a while, therefore this most recent effort will be the last for a small time. Previously I made a mosaic … Continue reading

The Hare Mosaic II

Since last week’s discussion of the hare mosaic I’ve been thinking again about the place of the ‘hare’ in ancient religion.

For all the talk of its potential significance in its namesake mosaic, the significance of the hare in ancient religion is a veritable mystery and uncovering the reason would add such great flavour to an already absorbing piece of art.

For the sake of a reason, my best guestimation would be that the hare, as well as the goose and cockerel, were all the zoomorphic representation of a native deity or at least the animal companion of.  Such companions are widely known from ancient pagan religions such as the cockerel and ram being associated with Mercury.   A parallel can also be drawn to a local belief, across the Cotswolds where a series of sculptures dedicated to a local deity all portray a figure associated with a bird, given the area possibly a wood pigeon.  

This to my mind would suggest that, if the hare was taboo as food or a hunting item and looked after or revered by the native British, then being the associate to a deity would be a most plausible explanation for such behaviour and worship. Nevertheless this is just conjecture and should be treated as such, but it never hurts to enquire and it would certainly be plausible. Furthermore even if it is a valid assumption  the next mystery is who was this deity, and what powers did it behold?  It seems history loves nothing more than a mystery.